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Día Internacional de la Mujer 2011.

Asociación de Madres Solteras y Grupos Vulnerables para el Desarrollo Social \\\"Por un Trato más digno Yo Madre Soltera Aquí Estoy A.C.\\\" ¡Visita la página de Madres Solas Aquí! More »

Entrega de Silla de Ruedas.

Asociación de Madres Solteras y Grupos Vulnerables para el Desarrollo Social \\\"Por un Trato más digno Yo Madre Soltera Aquí Estoy A.C.\\\" Visita la página de Madres Solas Aquí. More »

Compartiendo con nuestras socias y socios de la tercera edad de Molino Abajo, Temoaya, Estado de México.

Asociación de Madres Solteras y Grupos Vulnerables para el Desarrollo Social \\\"Por un Trato más digno Yo Madre Soltera Aquí Estoy A.C.\\\" Visita la página de Madres Solas Aquí. More »

Visita la página de “Código Ayuda A.C.” Aquí

Entrega de Reconocimiento por la AMS a la labor de Gabriela Goldsmith Presidenta de \\\"Código Ayuda A.C.” More »

Día de la Niñez 2011 con nuestras socias y socios de San Lorenzo Tepaltitlán, Toluca, Estado de México.

Asociación de Madres Solteras y Grupos Vulnerables para el Desarrollo Social \\\"Por un Trato más digno Yo Madre Soltera Aquí Estoy A.C.\\\" Visita la página de Madres Solas Aquí. More »

Entrega de Silla de Ruedas.

Asociación de Madres Solteras y Grupos Vulnerables para el Desarrollo Social \\\"Por un Trato más digno Yo Madre Soltera Aquí Estoy A.C.\\\" Visita la página de Madres Solas Aquí. More »

“Yo Me Declaro Defensor” de los Defensores de Derechos Humanos

Participación en la campaña “Yo Me Declaro Defensor” de los Defensores de Derechos Humanos por la Alta Comisionada de los Derechos Humanos de la ONU Navy Pillay. More »

Entrega de Reconocimiento al Lic. Enrique Peña Nieto por su apoyo como gobernador a los grupos vulnerables de nuestra Asociación.

Asociación de Madres Solteras y Grupos Vulnerables para el Desarrollo Social \\\"Por un Trato más digno Yo Madre Soltera Aquí Estoy A.C.\\\" Visita la página de Madres Solas Aquí. More »

Compartiendo con nuestras socias y socios de la tercera edad en Molino Abajo, Temoaya, Estado de México.

Asociación de Madres Solteras y Grupos Vulnerables para el Desarrollo Social \\\"Por un Trato más digno Yo Madre Soltera Aquí Estoy A.C.\\\" ¡Visita la página de Madres Solas Aquí! More »

Compartiendo con nuestras socias y socios de la tercera edad en Molino Abajo, Temoaya, Estado de México.

Asociación de Madres Solteras y Grupos Vulnerables para el Desarrollo Social \\\"Por un Trato más digno Yo Madre Soltera Aquí Estoy A.C.\\\" ¡Visita la página de Madres Solas Aquí! More »

Compartiendo con nuestras socias y socios de la tercera edad en Molino Abajo, Temoaya, Estado de México.

Asociación de Madres Solteras y Grupos Vulnerables para el Desarrollo Social \\\"Por un Trato más digno Yo Madre Soltera Aquí Estoy A.C.\\\" ¡Visita la página de Madres Solas Aquí! More »

Compartiendo con nuestras socias y socios de la tercera edad en Molino Abajo, Temoaya, Estado de México.

Asociación de Madres Solteras y Grupos Vulnerables para el Desarrollo Social \\\"Por un Trato más digno Yo Madre Soltera Aquí Estoy A.C.\\\" ¡Visita la página de Madres Solas Aquí! More »

Thelma Dorantes Autora y Actriz principal de la obra de Teatro \\

Visita de Thelma Dorantes a las oficina de la Asociación de Madres Solteras y Grupos Vulnerables para el Desarrollo Social \\\"Por un Trato más digno Yo Madre Soltera Aquí Estoy A.C.\\\" en Toluca, Estado de México. More »

Thelma Dorantes Autora y Actriz principal de la obra de Teatro \\

Visita de Thelma Dorantes a las oficina de la Asociación de Madres Solteras y Grupos Vulnerables para el Desarrollo Social \\\"Por un Trato más digno Yo Madre Soltera Aquí Estoy A.C.\\\" en Toluca, Estado de México. More »

Thelma Dorantes Autora y Actriz principal de la obra de Teatro \\

Visita de Thelma Dorantes a las oficina de la Asociación de Madres Solteras y Grupos Vulnerables para el Desarrollo Social \\\"Por un Trato más digno Yo Madre Soltera Aquí Estoy A.C.\\\" en Toluca, Estado de México. More »

Premio Nacional del Trabajo 2012.

Entrega a los trabajadores de la Dirección de Organización y Desarrollo Administrativo de la Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México del Premio Nacional del Trabajo 2012 por la Secretaría de Trabajo y Previsión Social del Gobierno de México. More »

 

Category Archives: Noticias

In Trump’s first 100 days, news stories citing his tweets were more likely to be negative

October 18, 2017

President Donald Trump’s prolific Twitter output has become source material for news outlets covering him – and during the early days of his administration, stories that included his tweets stood out from those that did not. They were more likely to have a negative assessment of the administration’s words and actions and to include a challenge by the journalist to something Trump or a member of his administration said, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of more than 3,000 stories across 24 media outlets.

A recent report from the Center found that about one-in-six news stories about the president or the administration (16%) during the first 100 days of Trump’s presidency included one of his tweets. Another element measured in the study was whether statements from the journalist or statements cited in a story gave an overall positive or negative evaluation of the Trump administration’s words or actions – or fell somewhere in between.

This deeper analysis reveals that the stories that included a direct tweet from Trump were more likely than others to have an overall negative assessment of him or his administration – that is, had at least twice as many negative as positive statements. Just over half of stories that had a tweet from Trump (54%) had a negative assessment, 12 percentage points higher than stories that did not contain any of his tweets (42%). (Overall, 44% of all stories studied during the time period studied gave a negative assessment.)

Additionally, stories with at least one of the president’s tweets were more likely to include a direct refutation by the reporter of something the president or a member of his administration said – whether it was a refutation of the tweet itself, a statement related to the issue referenced in the tweet or another statement altogether in the story. Overall, one-in-ten stories included a direct refutation. This jumps to about one-in-five stories with a Trump tweet (21%), more than double the share that did not contain one (8%).

Amid these differences between stories with and without the president’s tweets, there was one notable similarity: A large majority of both those with a tweet and those without one structured their coverage around character and leadership rather than policy. However, those with a tweet were even more likely to focus on the president’s leadership and character (85%) than those that did not (72%).

Note: Read more about the study’s methodology here.

Topics: Federal Government, U.S. Political Figures, News Media Ethics and Practices, Social Media, Donald Trump

  1. is a senior writer/editor focusing on journalism research at Pew Research Center.
  2. Photo of Jeffrey Gottfried
    is a senior researcher focusing on journalism research at Pew Research Center.

Hardly any federal employees are fired for poor performance. That could be a good sign, report says.

The low rate at which federal employees are fired for poor performance doesn’t prove the government accepts it but instead “could actually be a positive sign,” the agency that decides appeals of discipline against federal employees has said.

A report from the Merit Systems Protection Board in effect responds to members of Congress and others who contend that federal managers don’t care, or don’t dare, to take disciplinary action because of civil service protections.

“The number of employees removed for poor performance should not be used as a measure of an agency’s commitment to properly managing the performance of its employees,” said the report issued Tuesday.

In addition to hearing appeals, the MSPB conducts studies of federal workplace issues. In a report based on a survey the agency conducted and other research, MSPB identified three keys to good management of employees’ performance: the work unit having sufficient resources to get the job done; training of supervisors on setting and enforcing expectations; and accurate standards to measure performance.

It said that the more those factors are present, the more likely supervisors are to say they can effectively deal with poor performers, including by helping them improve their work or firing them if necessary — and the less likely they are to say they have poor performers among their employees in the first place.

“This data is one reason why examining removal rates is not a good method for assessing whether an agency is properly managing employee performance. If the agency is successful in preventing poor performance and addressing it when it does occur, removals would become unnecessary. In that way, a small number of performance-based removals could actually be a positive sign,” MSPB said.

“Of course, it could also be indicative of an agency that fails to remove those in need of removal,” it added.

Federal agencies use formal performance rating programs for almost all of their career employees, typically with five levels. The ratings are used in deciding on promotions, merit pay increases, cash awards or, more rarely, discipline. Except in the most severe cases, before being disciplined low-performing employees must be given notice of their shortcomings and the support to help them improve over a defined time.

Of the 2.1 million federal employees in a government database excluding the U.S. Postal Service, intelligence agencies and certain other categories, about 10,000 are fired for either poor performance or misconduct each year. Among the roughly 200,000 who leave each year, the large majority resign, retire or reach the end of a temporary appointment.

That low rate of firing has been cited in proposals to force agencies to take action and to restrict employee rights to appeal through the MSPB or other channels, commonly a long and contentious process. Most of the support  comes from Republicans, although Congress has passed several measures on a bipartisan basis, including a law enacted this year shortening the appeal process for front-line employees of the Department of Veterans Affairs and restricting senior employees there to an in-house process. And last week the House unanimously passed and sent to the White House a bill requiring that agencies discipline officials who retaliate against whistleblowers, including mandatory firing for a second offense.

Individual employees, too, commonly express dissatisfaction with how agencies handle poor performers among their co-workers. In an annual governmentwide survey, one of the highest negatives each year involves whether steps are taken to deal with employees who cannot or will not improve their performance — this year only 34 percent agreed while 42 percent disagreed, with the rest neutral.

Much of the argument that the government doesn’t sufficiently hold its employees accountable has focused on misconduct rather than on performance. The database of removals does not distinguish between the two; in the government system, especially poor performance can be deemed to be misconduct, as well. The firing figures further do not reflect the unknown number of employees who quit to avoid having a firing on their records.

As in a previous report, the MSPB said that firing is just one of the ways to deal with a poor performer, adding that “a performance-based removal action is not even the most common of these.”

In the MSPB’s survey, among supervisors who said they had had a poor performer who is no longer in the organization, 57 percent said the employee resigned, retired or left to work elsewhere; 15 percent said the employee was removed for performance reasons; 13 percent said the employee was removed for conduct reasons; 7 percent said the employee was moved to a different position; and the rest cited other outcomes.

“Because successful performance management can reduce the need to remove an employee, removal data is not a good measure for agency performance management metrics. . . . It is understandable why stakeholders may want an easily calculated proxy for determining if agencies are properly managing the performance of their employees. Unfortunately, removal data cannot accurately serve this function,” the report said.

Hardly any federal employees are fired for poor performance. That could be a good sign, report says.

The low rate at which federal employees are fired for poor performance doesn’t prove the government accepts it but instead “could actually be a positive sign,” the agency that decides appeals of discipline against federal employees has said.

A report from the Merit Systems Protection Board in effect responds to members of Congress and others who contend that federal managers don’t care, or don’t dare, to take disciplinary action because of civil service protections.

“The number of employees removed for poor performance should not be used as a measure of an agency’s commitment to properly managing the performance of its employees,” said the report issued Tuesday.

In addition to hearing appeals, the MSPB conducts studies of federal workplace issues. In a report based on a survey the agency conducted and other research, MSPB identified three keys to good management of employees’ performance: the work unit having sufficient resources to get the job done; training of supervisors on setting and enforcing expectations; and accurate standards to measure performance.

It said that the more those factors are present, the more likely supervisors are to say they can effectively deal with poor performers, including by helping them improve their work or firing them if necessary — and the less likely they are to say they have poor performers among their employees in the first place.

“This data is one reason why examining removal rates is not a good method for assessing whether an agency is properly managing employee performance. If the agency is successful in preventing poor performance and addressing it when it does occur, removals would become unnecessary. In that way, a small number of performance-based removals could actually be a positive sign,” MSPB said.

“Of course, it could also be indicative of an agency that fails to remove those in need of removal,” it added.

Federal agencies use formal performance rating programs for almost all of their career employees, typically with five levels. The ratings are used in deciding on promotions, merit pay increases, cash awards or, more rarely, discipline. Except in the most severe cases, before being disciplined low-performing employees must be given notice of their shortcomings and the support to help them improve over a defined time.

Of the 2.1 million federal employees in a government database excluding the U.S. Postal Service, intelligence agencies and certain other categories, about 10,000 are fired for either poor performance or misconduct each year. Among the roughly 200,000 who leave each year, the large majority resign, retire or reach the end of a temporary appointment.

That low rate of firing has been cited in proposals to force agencies to take action and to restrict employee rights to appeal through the MSPB or other channels, commonly a long and contentious process. Most of the support  comes from Republicans, although Congress has passed several measures on a bipartisan basis, including a law enacted this year shortening the appeal process for front-line employees of the Department of Veterans Affairs and restricting senior employees there to an in-house process. And last week the House unanimously passed and sent to the White House a bill requiring that agencies discipline officials who retaliate against whistleblowers, including mandatory firing for a second offense.

Individual employees, too, commonly express dissatisfaction with how agencies handle poor performers among their co-workers. In an annual governmentwide survey, one of the highest negatives each year involves whether steps are taken to deal with employees who cannot or will not improve their performance — this year only 34 percent agreed while 42 percent disagreed, with the rest neutral.

Much of the argument that the government doesn’t sufficiently hold its employees accountable has focused on misconduct rather than on performance. The database of removals does not distinguish between the two; in the government system, especially poor performance can be deemed to be misconduct, as well. The firing figures further do not reflect the unknown number of employees who quit to avoid having a firing on their records.

As in a previous report, the MSPB said that firing is just one of the ways to deal with a poor performer, adding that “a performance-based removal action is not even the most common of these.”

In the MSPB’s survey, among supervisors who said they had had a poor performer who is no longer in the organization, 57 percent said the employee resigned, retired or left to work elsewhere; 15 percent said the employee was removed for performance reasons; 13 percent said the employee was removed for conduct reasons; 7 percent said the employee was moved to a different position; and the rest cited other outcomes.

“Because successful performance management can reduce the need to remove an employee, removal data is not a good measure for agency performance management metrics. . . . It is understandable why stakeholders may want an easily calculated proxy for determining if agencies are properly managing the performance of their employees. Unfortunately, removal data cannot accurately serve this function,” the report said.

Senators reach bipartisan deal on short-term Obamacare fix

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Two U.S. senators on Tuesday announced a bipartisan breakthrough to shore up Obamacare, an agreement that would revive federal subsidies for health insurers, and President Donald Trump voiced support for the deal.

The agreement worked out by Republican Senator Lamar Alexander and Democratic Senator Patty Murray would meet some Democratic objectives, including a revival of the subsidies for Obamacare and restoring $106 million in funding for a federal program that helps people enroll in insurance plans.

In exchange, Republicans would get more flexibility for states to offer a wider variety of health insurance plans while maintaining the requirement that sick and healthy people be charged the same rates for coverage.

The Trump administration announced last week it would stop paying billions of dollars to insurers to help low-income Americans pay out-of-pocket medical expenses, part of the Republican president’s effort to dismantle Obamacare, Democratic former President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare law.

Trump, who campaigned for president last year on a pledge to repeal Obamacare, has repeatedly criticized the 2010 law, the Affordable Care Act.

But, speaking to reporters at the White House on Tuesday, Trump suggested he could get behind the plan for a short-term fix that Alexander and Murray had settled on.

He said it would help get Obamacare through a “very dangerous little period.” But he also said he was still committed to a broader overhaul of the program.

“The solution will be for about a year or two years,” Trump said at a joint news conference with Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras.

Shares of U.S. hospital operators, including Tenet Healthcare Corp and HCA Healthcare Inc, moved higher after news of the deal. Tenet shares were last up 4 percent, while HCA was 2.3 percent higher. Shares of some U.S. health insurers also extended their gains on the day, with Anthem Inc last up 2.5 percent and Centene Corp rising 2.8 percent.

Reporting by Yasmeen Abutaleb, Richard Cowan and Lewis Krauskopf; Writing by Yasmeen Abutaleb and Caren Bohan; Editing by Paul Simao and Jonathan Oatis

Trump likely to name Fed chair by early November: source familiar

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump has a pool of five candidates to choose from for the next chair of the Federal Reserve and is likely to announce his choice before going to Asia in early November, a source familiar with the situation said on Tuesday.

Trump has an interview scheduled on Thursday with current Fed Chair Janet Yellen, whose term expires in February. She is one of the five candidates, the source said.

The others consist of his chief economic adviser, Gary Cohn, along with former Fed Governor Kevin Warsh, Fed Governor Jerome Powell and Stanford University economist John Taylor.

By the time Trump meets with Yellen, he will have had meetings with all five of the candidates, the source said.

The source said announcing the choice by the time Trump leaves for Asia on Nov. 3 would give the Senate time for the confirmation process.

In a Reuters poll of 40 economists taken during the past few days, a slim majority said they expected Powell – a lawyer and former investment banker who has served as a member of the Fed’s Board of Governors since May 2012 – would get the nod.

The next most likely choice was Kevin Warsh, who served as a Fed governor during the financial crisis.

Reporting by Steve Holland; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama

Trump's drug czar nominee withdraws from consideration

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump’s pick to lead the Office of National Drug Control Policy has withdrawn his name from consideration, the president said on Tuesday, after it was reported the lawmaker had worked to weaken government efforts to slow the flow of opioid drugs that have gripped the country.

U.S. Representative Tom Marino “has informed me that he is withdrawing his name from consideration as drug czar. Tom is a fine man and a great Congressman!” Trump wrote in a post on Twitter.

Reporting by Makini Brice; Editing by Susan Heavey and Jeffrey Benkoe

Trump says he could jettison drug czar pick

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump said on Monday he would review a report that his nominee for drug czar championed a law that weakened the government’s ability to fight the nation’s opioid epidemic, and said he could consider jettisoning the pick.

“We’re going to look into the report,” Trump told reporters at the White House.

Asked if the report had undercut his confidence in his nominee to head the Office of National Drug Control Policy, Representative Tom Marino, Trump said: ”I have not spoken to him, but I will speak to him, and I’ll make that determination.

“If I think it’s 1 percent negative to doing what we want to do, I will make a change, yes,” he added.

Marino’s office did not immediately return a request for comment.

The report by the Washington Post and CBS described how Marino introduced and helped push through industry-backed legislation that undercut the Drug Enforcement Administration’s ability to freeze suspicious shipments of pain pills from drug companies.

A number of Democrats called for Trump to abandon his nominee in the wake of the report.

“Congressman Marino no longer has my trust or that of the public that he will aggressively pursue the fight against opioid abuse,” Democratic Senator Joe Manchin said in a statement. Manchin’s state of West Virginia has been hit hard by the opioid crisis.

In his remarks to reporters, Trump suggested he would be open to changing the law that Marino, a fellow Republican, helped push through and said he would make good on an earlier promise to declare the opioid epidemic a national emergency.

“We are going to be doing that next week,” he said, calling the crisis a “massive problem.”

Opioids were involved in more than 33,000 deaths in the United States in 2015, the last year of publicly available data, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Overdoses from the category of drugs nearly quadrupled between 1999 and 2015, the CDC said.

Reporting by James Oliphant; Writing by Makini Brice and Tim Ahmann; Editing by Lisa Shumaker and Leslie Adler

Trump says he could jettison drug czar pick

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump said on Monday he would review a report that his nominee for drug czar championed a law that weakened the government’s ability to fight the nation’s opioid epidemic, and said he could consider jettisoning the pick.

“We’re going to look into the report,” Trump told reporters at the White House.

Asked if the report had undercut his confidence in his nominee to head the Office of National Drug Control Policy, Representative Tom Marino, Trump said: ”I have not spoken to him, but I will speak to him, and I’ll make that determination.

“If I think it’s 1 percent negative to doing what we want to do, I will make a change, yes,” he added.

Marino’s office did not immediately return a request for comment.

The report by the Washington Post and CBS described how Marino introduced and helped push through industry-backed legislation that undercut the Drug Enforcement Administration’s ability to freeze suspicious shipments of pain pills from drug companies.

A number of Democrats called for Trump to abandon his nominee in the wake of the report.

“Congressman Marino no longer has my trust or that of the public that he will aggressively pursue the fight against opioid abuse,” Democratic Senator Joe Manchin said in a statement. Manchin’s state of West Virginia has been hit hard by the opioid crisis.

In his remarks to reporters, Trump suggested he would be open to changing the law that Marino, a fellow Republican, helped push through and said he would make good on an earlier promise to declare the opioid epidemic a national emergency.

“We are going to be doing that next week,” he said, calling the crisis a “massive problem.”

Opioids were involved in more than 33,000 deaths in the United States in 2015, the last year of publicly available data, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Overdoses from the category of drugs nearly quadrupled between 1999 and 2015, the CDC said.

Reporting by James Oliphant; Writing by Makini Brice and Tim Ahmann; Editing by Lisa Shumaker and Leslie Adler

Senate confirms Callista Gingrich as U.S. Ambassador to Vatican

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Senate on Monday voted to confirm President Donald Trump’s nomination of Callista Gingrich to be the U.S. Ambassador to the Vatican.

Gingrich, 51, an author, documentary filmmaker and former congressional aide, is the wife of former Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Newt Gingrich, a vocal Trump ally.

Her nomination was approved on a 70-23 vote.

Gingrich’s nomination to the post at the Holy See in May caused some controversy because of her marriage to Gingrich, with whom she became involved when he was still married to his second wife. Gingrich is Roman Catholic.

Gingrich may need to smooth over relations with Pope Francis, who has criticized the Trump administration’s positions on the environment and immigration.

Reporting by Richard Cowan and Patricia Zengerle; Writing by Makini Brice; Editing by James Dalgleish; Editing by Dan Grebler, David Alexander and Eric Walsh

Key Republican says Trump must work with Europe on Iran

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Senator Bob Corker, the Republican chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, urged President Donald Trump’s administration on Monday to work closely with European allies as it develops its new Iran policy.

“This is something that can only work if the administration exercises tremendous diplomacy with our European allies,” Corker told reporters as the Senate returned to the Capitol for the first time since Trump announced his Iran policy.

Trump defied both allies and adversaries on Friday by refusing to certify that Iran is complying with an international agreement on its nuclear program, and threatened that he might ultimately terminate the accord.

Corker is leading an effort in Congress to write legislation setting new conditions for the U.S. role in the pact, such as automatically reimposing sanctions if Iran is deemed to be within one year of developing a nuclear weapon.

Details have not been finalized, but the plan’s outline raised concerns that it might cause Washington – not Tehran – to violate the deal reached with Britain, France, Germany, Russia, China, Iran and the European Union.

Corker said Democratic senators told him that Washington must work with Europe.

Trump’s fellow Republicans control the Senate and House of Representatives, but their Senate majority is so narrow that most legislation needs Democratic votes to pass.

European Union foreign ministers meeting in Luxembourg on Monday reaffirmed their support for the nuclear pact and said failure to uphold it could have serious consequences for regional peace, and undermine efforts to check North Korea’s nuclear ambitions.

Corker said he had tried to convince European officials that the news on Iran was not all bad.

“I … shared with them that, look, if I were them, I’d look at this as ‘the glass is half full,’ he didn’t withdraw from the JCPOA (the nuclear deal), and that’s step one,” Corker said.

He described efforts under way in Washington as a chance to address “deficiencies” in the nuclear pact, in which Iran agreed to curb its nuclear ambitions in exchange for sanctions relief.

Every Republican in Congress, as well as some Democrats, opposed the accord when it was reached by former Democratic Barack Obama’s administration in 2015.

Corker and Republican Senator Tom Cotton, who worked with him on the legislation, met later on Monday on Iran with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Reporting by Patricia Zengerle; Editing by James Dalgleish

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[Materias de Estudio]
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 [México] [Edomex] [Estados] [Emprendedores Tech] [Prensa Educativa] [Universities] [Empleo] [Trabajo y Sindicatos]
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